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Ironing the Wax out of a Batik

Thursday, October 11, 2018

Making a batik is the satisfying process of layering wax and dye to create bold, intricate designs. The more layers of dye and wax that are added, the thicker and stiffer the fabric will become. At the end of this process, you're left with a hard, milky-looking piece of cloth. Here's how to iron the wax out of your batik to get the vibrancy back into your designs!  Read more

Screen Printing Hand Drawings using Film Marker Pens

Thursday, September 13, 2018

Translating drawings into print doesn't have to include scanning and digitally manipulating your design on a computer. By using opaque film markers onto screen film we are able to skip the digital part altogether and create a photographic screen directly from the drawings you produce. This allows you to work in full scale, even tracing other print layers or design elements so that they will fit exactly.  Read more

Caring for an Exposed Screen

Thursday, August 30, 2018

Jigsaw Linocut with a Rainbow Roll

Thursday, August 16, 2018

A rainbow roll is a great way to easily add a beautiful range of colours to a linocut. This project uses only two colours to create a range of shades, all in one printing layer.  Read more

What's a Halftone? Screen Printing a Tonal Image

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

People often want to screen print photographic images and hope to use black and white photographs for this. To do this you need an exposed screen. The way screen printing works is the mesh either has to be open or closed (ink passes through the open areas but cannot pass through the closed areas) therefore grey tones do not work. To make a photographic image work we have to fool the brain into thinking that there are grey areas.  Read more

How Much Detail on Exposed Screens?

Thursday, June 07, 2018

When designing artwork for exposed screens it can be very difficult to figure out what level of detail you can include. Different mesh counts will be able to handle different levels of detail. The mesh number relates to how many threads there are per cm of mesh: 32T has 32 threads per cm, 120T has 120 threads per cm etc. Ideally, 43T mesh is used for printing onto fabric and 90T is used for printing onto paper. We've put together a quick test to see what detail can be achieved on our two most common meshes: 43T and 90T.  Read more

Screen Printing onto Dark Fabrics with Yellow Ink

Thursday, March 15, 2018

In last week's blog post we began looking at which inks were suitable for screen printing onto dark fabrics. We used three different screen printing inks and looked at the difference between standard and opaque inks when printing with white. All of the white inks printed well onto the black fabric - white inks are usually thicker and more pigmented. This is not the case with coloured inks - standard screen printing inks are translucent and will therefore show some of the base colour through when printed. When printing onto white or pale coloured fabrics this is not a problem. Most standard screen printing inks will disappear into dark backgrounds and you'll need to use an opaque ink in order for it to show up. Opaque Inks are more highly pigmented and thicker than standard inks. Again, we've tested three inks to help you to decide which to use, this time all in yellow: Read more

Screen Printing onto Dark Fabrics with White Ink

Thursday, March 08, 2018

Screen printing onto fabric tends to get a little complicated as soon as you want to print onto dark coloured fabrics. Standard screen printing inks are translucent and will therefore show some of the base colour through when printed. When printing onto white or pale coloured fabrics this is not a problem. Most standard screen printing inks will disappear into dark backgrounds and you'll need to use an opaque ink in order for it to show up. Opaque Inks are more highly pigmented and thicker than standard inks. The exception to this rule is white ink. White screen printing ink tends to be a little thicker and more highly pigmented than other standard inks. In order to help you decide which ink you need, we've printed onto black fabric using three different white pre-mixed inks: 

Speedball Fabric Screen Printing InkPermaset Aqua Screen Printing Ink and Permaset Aqua Supercover Screen Printing Ink.

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Using Different Tools to Make Marks on Lino

Thursday, February 22, 2018

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Which Inks Can I Use?

Thursday, January 11, 2018

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